The Transition to RV Fulltiming – Factors to Consider

The decision to live full time in an RV is not one that should be taken lightly.  The transition from brick and mortar – also ‘stick house’ living to full-timing in a recreational vehicle entails a lot of lifestyle changes. These are some of the many factors you will need to think about if you are considering adopting the RV lifestyle. There is certainly a lot involved in making the transition, so it is well advised to thoroughly research what is involved before making the leap. Preliminary Research in preparation for RV living. One good investment for people considering moving into a recreational vehicle is to subscribe to magazines ahead of time.  Publications such as trailer life magazine can provide lots of insight into exactly what life living in an RV full time is like, and can also be a great source of information about different types of RV’s available for purchase. The Trailer Life Campground Directory campground directory is a perennial favorite with RVers, and well worth purchasing. Membership in one of the many RV clubs – the Good Sam Club is a very popular one – is another great way to immerse yourself in the RVing world even before you leave home.  Even if you do not yet own an RV, there is a lot of fun to be had just flicking through these types of materials daydreaming about the day when you will make the transition. What do I do with my possessions? Cars, clothing and furniture; there are just a few of the items you will have to find a home for when you downsize from a regular full-sized house to a small coach or travel trailer.  While you can – and will – keep some of your clothes for life on the road, space limitations mean that you will more than likely have to cut back on your wardrobe. How about your furnishings?  There is no place for a three piece sofa sets or dining room tables in a travel trailer.  Along with your clothes, you will have to come up with a way of dealing with these when you start RVing full time also. As for your automobiles, there is a good chance they are inappropriate for RV living also.  If you will be towing you require a large truck with a towing capacity large enough to tow a big trailer or a fifth wheel motorhome.  On the other hand, if you purchase a motor-coach you may want to keep a small vehicle for use as a toad vehicle. Clearly all these superfluous personal possessions need to be handled somehow.  One option is to simply sell everything.  The advantage of this is that you can potentially raise quite a bit of cash, which can come in handy in covering some of the upfront costs associated with the transition to full-time RVing. An alternative is to simply store your belongings.  This can either be in a secure storage facility – which entails a hefty monthly […] Read more »

Health Insurance for RV Nomads

Being self employed and working out of your home is a dream for many of us.  Having internet access makes this possible for a lot of people.  Wifi coverage is available in metropolitan areas and satellite technology is available for those areas not covered by the traditional internet providers.  This allows anyone to live in an RV and run their business literally anywhere in the country. This provides some unique challenges.  One major one is finding health insurance.  We live in a country that regulates the health insurance industry on a state by state basis.  The portability of health coverage can be restricted and limited. Currently, there is no one carrier that can offer a health plan that provides HMO coverage for all 50 states.  Normally, HMO (Health Maintenance Organization) coverage provides the most comprehensive coverage at the best price, but normally limits access to specific providers and hospital except in an emergency. To get around this issue, PPO (Preferred Provider Organizations) plans and Indemnity plans are available.  These type of plans offer coverage that are not as restrictive as HMOs. The first item on the RV Nomad’s agenda would be to have a permanent or local address when looking to purchase a policy.  This can be accomplished by getting a PO Box at the UPS store, Mailboxes, Etc or using your home address.  What is important is in what state and your purchase your policy. Different states have different medical costs and regulations.  You need to shop around and find what a similar plan would cost in the state you want to have as the permanent address.  This can be accomplished online by using your favorite search engine and looking for health insurance. Note:  the HealthCare Reform Act will require all US citizens to have health coverage.  This will come into effect on January 1, 2014.  When this comes into effect, health coverage will be costing more.  This is due to mandated benefits and guaranteed issue.  Depending on your circumstances, you may want to look at quotes for coverage effective before January 1, 2014 and those that become effective on January 1, 2014.  Getting a policy sooner if you qualify may save some money. The easiest way to do your comparison shopping is to select a PPO Plan with a $1000 or $5000 deductible and $20 or $30 copays and 20% coinsurance.  Most carriers will have a plan close to this benefit configuration. With the selected plan, look at coverage costs in several states you may want to purchase your coverage in.  Also look for carriers that offer coverage in each state.  Blue Cross/Blue Shield has a national PPO network.  Aetna, UnitedHealth, Cigna and Humana are also national carriers that can offer nation wide PPO coverage. If you find this process overwhelming, contact a Broker that specializes in individual health insurance.  The first place to start is with the agent you get your other insurance coverage from.  If they do not offer health insurance, they will know someone to […] Read more »

Funding the Lifestyle

Making money to support living on the road can be done in any of several different ways.  One potential method is to live off your investment profile.  I am personally a big fan of dividend investing for a growing income over time, and maintain a blog on my efforts and thoughts in that arena.  Feel free to click here to learn more! Read more »

Hiking Knob Hill Trail Dallas

Knob Hill Trail is an 11 mile trail to the West of Lake Grapevine in the DFW area.  I hiked this fully for the first time last Monday afternoon and evening after having previously visited for a short one hour like just before sunset a couple of weeks ago. The first thing I noticed this trip is that in just the first half mile the trail was been completely rerouted since my original visit.  It was previously a hard packed – obviously long used – path with lots of ups and downs thru mostly dry creek beds.  Now this old path has been blocked off with tree branches, and a new much flatter path is open.  I don’t know if this is a permanent of temporary change, but I’m sure the offroad bikers will not be happy with this new more mellow path. Anyway, moving on!  After the first half mile the path rejoined what was clearly the normal hard packed path,  following this for another half mile it weaves thru trees and follows Denton Creek – which flows into Lake Grapevine.  Shortly after the first mile marker the path levels out and becomes very simple to follow, so for other Knob Hill hikers know that the first – and the last on the return – mile will be the most physically challenging. The walk is pleasant in general.  I’ll touch a few of the ‘highlights’ briefly.  At about the 2.5 miles mark it gets a little shady…and not in the cool sense.  Lots of empty beer bottles, trash, and a bench that looks suspiciously like part of a meth lab can be seen in the remote woods off the path.  While I wouldn’t want to frequent that spot in the dark, it is fine during the day.  Thankfully this rather ugly area only lasts for about a half mile and things improve again. At the 3.5 mile is a nice little bench on a hill.  You can sit here for a snack or a break and look out over Lake Grapevine.  It is not Grade A scenery, but a nice reward for making it out that far.  Knob Hill trail itself does go further, so do not head back thinking you are at the halfway point! One point worthy of note – the mile markers on this trail are marked on both sides – so you can tell both how far in you are and how far there is to go.  For example, when I got to Mile 4 the backside of the pole indicated I had 7 more mile left on my hike.  Shortly after mile 4 I was surprised to see another hiker – only the second person I had seen all day – materialize shortly ahead of me.  When I got to the point he had appeared I discovered there was another short trail joining the main path from a parking lot. The Knob Kill Trailhead is accessed by road from Hwy 377 just south of […] Read more »